Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

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A ginger cat gets a needle.

Cat Vaccinations

Vaccines are our best defence against a number of potentially fatal pathogens. For this reason, there are several vaccines we offer to reduce the chance of infection. Our primary vaccine given to all cats is FVRCP (Feline Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia). We also offer the Leukemia vaccine as well as the Rabies vaccine, which is typically given based on lifestyle.

Does my indoor cat need to be vaccinated?


Yes, it is recommended that indoor cats still receive the FVRCP vaccine every 1-3 years (depending on the brand of vaccine used). It is also recommended to vaccinate indoor cats against rabies.

What are FVRCP and core vaccines for cats?


FVRCP is considered the core vaccines which all cats should receive. It protects against Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis and Calicivirus, both viruses that cause upper respiratory infections in cats, as well as Panleukopenia, a virus that significantly suppresses the immune system and causes severe gastrointestinal disease.

How often does my adult cat need to be vaccinated?


As long as the kitten series has been completed, indoor adult cats are usually vaccinated every 3 years. Outdoor cats are vaccinated against feline leukemia annually.

Are there any risks associated with cat vaccines?


Any vaccine carries the potential to trigger an allergic reaction. With that said, vaccine reactions are very uncommon. Some clinics will separate vaccines to reduce the risk of vaccine reaction. In the past, certain rare tumours have been linked to additives in vaccines. It has changed the way we administer vaccines to cats (using the limbs rather than between the shoulder blades).

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Does your feline have extra toes? The history behind Polydactyl Cats

Most cats have 18 toes; five toes on each of their front feet, and four on the back.  My cat, Mandy Pawtinkin, is blessed with 22 toes.  She has a congenital physical anomaly called polydactyly (Greek for ‘many digits’).  It is a genetic mutation that causes cats to be born with more than the usual number of toes on one or more of its paws.

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Last updated: June 26, 2020

Dear Clients,

With recent changes to restrictions on businesses, we are pleased to advise that effective June 5, 2020 the restrictions on veterinary practices have been lifted. Based on these changes, below are some important updates to our operating policies.

1. WE CAN NOW SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. OPERATING HOURS

Beginning June 8, we will be resuming our normal business hours:

Monday - Friday: 7:30 am – 8:00 pm
Saturday: 8:00 am - 2:00 pm
Sunday: Closed


NEW PET OWNERS

Have you welcomed a new furry family member to your home? We’d love to meet them! Visit our Must Know New Pet Owner Information page for useful resources and helpful recommendations for new pet owners.

Thank you for your patience and understanding and we look forward to seeing you and your furry family members again!

- Your dedicated team at Halifax Veterinary Hospital