Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

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A dog scratching behind its ear.

Dog Fleas and Ticks

Fleas and ticks are a significant problem within Halifax and Nova Scotia in general. Fleas spread rapidly in apartment buildings and are active outdoors at temperatures around 10°C and above. Even our indoor only pets are at risk of flea infestation, so prevention is critical. Ticks are active at even colder temperatures than fleas. They are hunting for hosts at temperatures around 4°C and above. In Halifax, we typically see either dog ticks or more importantly deer ticks (Black-legged Ticks). Deer ticks are the carriers for Lyme disease which is a blood-borne bacteria that is passed onto the host after a successful blood meal. For information on the clinical signs and testing, please give us a call.

How can I tell if my dog has fleas or ticks?


Scratching, biting and chewing the area all signs of fleas. Live fleas or flea ‘dirt’ can often be seen with a flea infestation, particularly in the mid to lower back near the tail. Ticks can be more challenging to find.

How can I prevent fleas and ticks on my dog?


There are numerous products available to prevent flea infestation and to kill ticks once they attach. Both over the counter and prescription products are available. Our helpful staff can help you determine which product would be most suitable for your dog.

What are the treatment options for dogs who have ticks?


It is a good idea to check your dog for ticks daily. If a tick is found attached to the skin, it can be removed with gentle firm traction at the site of attachment. A ‘Tick Twister’ can be very helpful in removing ticks in their entirety. If part of the head remains in the skin, it is important to monitor the site for signs of infections such as swelling, inflammation and discharge.

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Does your feline have extra toes? The history behind Polydactyl Cats

Most cats have 18 toes; five toes on each of their front feet, and four on the back.  My cat, Mandy Pawtinkin, is blessed with 22 toes.  She has a congenital physical anomaly called polydactyly (Greek for ‘many digits’).  It is a genetic mutation that causes cats to be born with more than the usual number of toes on one or more of its paws.

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Last updated: September 8, 2020

Dear Clients,

With recent changes to restrictions on businesses, we are pleased to advise that effective June 5, 2020 the restrictions on veterinary practices have been lifted. Based on these changes, below are some important updates to our operating policies.

1. WE CAN NOW SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. OPERATING HOURS

Beginning June 8, we will be resuming our normal business hours:

Monday - Friday: 7:30 am – 8:00 pm
Saturday: 8:00 am - 2:00 pm
Sunday: Closed


NEW PET OWNERS

Have you welcomed a new furry family member to your home? We’d love to meet them! Visit our Must Know New Pet Owner Information page for useful resources and helpful recommendations for new pet owners.

Thank you for your patience and understanding and we look forward to seeing you and your furry family members again!

- Your dedicated team at Halifax Veterinary Hospital